The Swerve, Prized Again

File photo by Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer

I have already said how surprising I found it that writing about the influence of classical literature on modern thought can be so effectively illuminated; in fact I could not help but say it a couple of times.  On this site we like to celebrate the success of our favored visionaries, writers, producers, educators, artists, thinkers, doers.  One of the publications at the university where he teaches had special reason today to put his name in visible circulation (click the image above to go to the story) with the announcement mentioned here:

Greenblatt’s book, which describes how an ancient Roman philosophical epic helped pave the way for modern thought, was awarded the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for general nonfiction.

In its citation, the Pulitzer board described “The Swerve” as “a provocative book arguing that an obscure work of philosophy, discovered nearly 600 years ago, changed the course of history by anticipating the science and sensibilities of today.”

The Harvard Crimson, another campus publication, reports on his reaction:

Greenblatt said winning the Pulitzer Prize filled him with “astonishment and wonder.” He said he found out Monday—the day the 2012 Pulitzer winners were announced—after receiving a call from an AP photographer who wanted to take his photo.

“I didn’t know I was even being considered,” Greenblatt said.

“The Swerve” previously won the 2011 National Book Award for nonfiction. Pulitzer Prizes are awarded annually in 21 categories for success in the areas of journalism, literature, and musical composition. Each prize is accompanied by a cash award of $10,000.

3 thoughts on “The Swerve, Prized Again

  1. Pingback: Needs Versus Wants « Raxa Collective

  2. Pingback: Taking The Geek Out Of Greek « Raxa Collective

  3. Pingback: Classics-R-Us | Raxa Collective

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