Cambium Carbon’s Reforestation Hubs

When we started this platform for sharing news and experiences related to innovative approaches to conservation, Seth was in Nicaragua and wrote multiple posts on Simplemente Madera  It is odd not to find a more recent post about their One Tree initiative because in early 2019 while sourcing for Authentica we sought out products that supported tree-planting. Today I am reminded of all that from a link I followed to Cambium Carbon in this story:

Courtesy of Cambium Carbon. Cambium Carbon aims to turn cut or fallen urban trees into wood products that can be sold to fund tree-planting efforts. Currently, most trees removed from cities are either chipped for low-grade application or hauled to a landfill at a significant cost.

Reforestation Hubs, ‘Coming Soon’ to a City Near You

Cambium Carbon, an initiative founded by YSE students to combat climate change and revitalize urban communities by reimagining the urban tree lifecycle, has earned a $200,000 Natural Climate Solution Accelerator Grant from The Nature Conservancy, in partnership with The Arbor Day Foundation.

Cambium Carbon — an initiative to combat climate change and revitalize urban communities by reimagining the urban tree lifecycle — has secured significant financial backing from several major conservation finance sources. Founded by Ben Christensen ’20 MEM and developed with classmate Marisa Repka ’20 MEM, Cambium recently partnered with The Arbor Day Foundation to earn its largest prize yet: a $200,000 Natural Climate Solution Accelerator Grant from The Nature Conservancy.

Cambium’s aim is to build “reforestation hubs,” a first-of-its-kind public-private partnership that restores city forests across the U.S. The company hopes to raise funds to plant trees in urban natural areas by valuing their benefits — like the raw wood material they provide and their ability to absorb carbon dioxide — to help turn the tide of urban forest loss.

More simply put, they are creating systems that turn cut or fallen urban trees into wood products that can be sold to fund tree-planting efforts. Usually, trees removed from cities are not put to their best use; they are either chipped for low-grade application or hauled to a landfill at a significant cost…

Read the whole article here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s