Climate Policies To Cheer On

(Washington Post illustration; Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post; iStock)

I am heading to Ithaca tomorrow for family reasons, so the third item described in the story that follows is of particular interest. But every one of the items is worth reflecting on, in a news world without enough such stories. Our thanks to the Washington Post Staff who put this list together:

10 recent climate policies that could make a difference

Stories from the past six months that show what local and national policy change can look like

The most recent IPCC report makes it clear: There is no one silver bullet that can address global warming. Instead, nations, businesses, communities and individuals all have a role to play in helping to create a safer and more sustainable future. But without action from the world’s wealthiest countries, the nations and people who are least at fault for fueling climate change will be the ones who suffer the most, the scientists behind the report warn.

Policy change, while not the only tool, can help spur the kind of large-scale change needed to curb carbon pollution. At The Post, we’re here to keep you up to date on what governments, communities and individuals are doing — or not doing — to tackle climate change and protect the environment.

We’ve compiled some of our stories from the past six months that show that local and national policy change is possible — although more is needed to avoid global warming’s worst impacts. You can also keep up on the latest actions from President Biden’s administration to protect the environment and combat climate change with our environmental action tracker.

1

Federal funding to make homes more energy efficient

By Anna Phillips

In March, the Biden administration announced plans to spend roughly $3.2 billion to retrofit hundreds of thousands of homes in low-income communities with the aim of slashing Americans’ energy bills and greenhouse gas emissions…

Read the whole article here.

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