Goodwill on Two Wheels

The Bike Project is run by former refugees and mechanics, who work with new refugees to fix up donated bikes. PHOTO: The Bike Project

The Bike Project is run by former refugees and mechanics, who work with new refugees to fix up donated bikes. PHOTO: The Bike Project

13,500 refugees flee to London each year. In that same period, around 27,500 bikes are abandoned. Just one of these abandoned bikes can help a refugee save 20 pounds a week on bus fare. That’s 1,040 pounds a year. Having fixed, donated, and helped refugees maintain over 300 bikes, The Bike Project is turning the wheels of goodwill and community development.

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When Mines Threaten to Swallow Cities

Kiruna is Sweden’s northernmost city, and soon, it's about to pick up and move two miles to the east, thanks to a mine. PHOTO: Co Exist

Kiruna is Sweden’s northernmost city, and soon, it’s about to pick up and move two miles to the east, thanks to a mine. PHOTO: Co Exist

Kiruna is home to the world’s largest underground iron ore mine, LKAB, supplying iron ore pellets to the steel industry in Europe. In most places, ore is extracted in opencast mines but not in Kiruna. The ore body in Kiruna is four kilometers long and 80 meters wide and stretches for at least two kilometers in the ground. For the moment, they mine at 1 km deep in Kiruna but they plan to mine until at least 2030 because they don’t know the extent of the ore body. But the city is sinking.

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A 3D Printed Shell for Fred

Fred the tortoise received a 3D printed shell after a horrific fire destroyed his original. PHOTO: 3DPrint

Fred the tortoise received a 3D printed shell after a horrific fire destroyed his original. PHOTO: 3DPrint

This one’s a win for goodwill and technology, a fine example of how how ideas can traverse diverse spaces and change lives. The high cost of human prostheses has long been a challenge for amputees and people born with missing limbs, but 3D printers have begun to change that. Unlike traditional manufacturing, 3D printing can create an object in almost any shape by reading a digital model. Using cheap materials, companies and non-profits can now print simple prosthetic hands and arms for as little as $50. And animals like Grecia and Derby, and now Fred, stand to gain, too.

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