Composting, Scaled For The Big Leagues

Corrado Construction. The Wilmington Organic Recycling Center in Delaware now produces some 75,000 tons of compost a year.

Corrado Construction. The Wilmington Organic Recycling Center in Delaware now produces some 75,000 tons of compost a year.

Thanks to Green Blog for coverage of the progress made getting this process in line with market forces:

Is it possible to make a living by turning rotting food into usable compost while also helping to curb greenhouse gas emissions and reduce landfill disposal costs?

The Peninsula Compost Company of Wilmington, Del., thinks so. Since 2009 it has been taking in growing quantities of spoiled food from supermarkets, restaurants, schools, and other sources and converting it in a matter of weeks into dark, moist, friable compost for use by landscapers, farmers and private gardeners. And in the last couple of months it began turning an operating profit, according to Nelson Widell, a Peninsula partner.

He declined to provide specifics. But Peninsula says it is now the largest commercial composter on the East Coast. Each day it buys about 400 tons of food waste a day from companies and municipalities that are seeking to reduce the rising cost of disposing food waste in landfills. Keeping the garbage out of landfills helps to limit the output of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that is generated from dumped food. Everything from spoiled bananas from the nearby Port of Wilmington to out-of-date hoagies from convenience stores is combined with yard waste and scrap wood to create a dark mass that serves as the feedstock for the compost. The mixture even includes $40 million a week in shredded bank notes from the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.

Read the whole story here.

One thought on “Composting, Scaled For The Big Leagues

  1. Pingback: It’s Never Too Late |

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